Mopeds and Bikes @ MSU

I get asked about the issue of the exploding moped population on our campus quite often.  They have become regular illegal users on our sidewalks and pathways on their way to park at bike racks (see photo of example signage at the racks).  They’re required to walk their mopeds on sidewalks/ paths to get to bike parking according to MSU Police/ Parking which I’ve rarely ever seen done in practice.  They have rapidly become a large percentage of the vehicles parked at the already over-crowded bike racks all over campus, in some cases (like on the east-side of Broad Business College) making up over 1/3 of them.  See recent photos in the gallery below all taken in 2016 except where noted.  A series of three videos (College of Business, Wells Hall, Jenison Fieldhouse) taken earlier in the fall of 2016 add additional visual confirmation of the extent of the problem at its peak.

Well, hope is on the horizon via a long-standing board-created campus committee called the AUTTC (All University Traffic & Transportation Committee) which advises the Chief of the MSU Police.  For those of you who don’t know, the AUTTC has done a lot of great things to help improve the bike-friendliness of MSU; for example, the MSU Bikes Service Center is a result of an AUTTC recommendation.

We finally put together a comprehensive set of recommendations to help resolve the moped issues that we’ve been observing over the past bunch of years.  These recommendations were based on the established examples of several peer universities and their successful strategy to reign in the abuses (referenced in the recommendations appendices (pg. 34-35).

The Police Chief accepted our 2015-2016 recommendations (which can be viewed here in detail) and  the Committee has been assured that the Police and Parking departments have staff working on implementing our recommendations on campus.  We haven’t been told of a time line for those coming changes but suffice it to say things will hopefully be much improved for the safety of our campus community on our sidewalks and pathways.

Darwin Award tips for Cyclists

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So, you’re an aspiring Darwin Awardee and have a bike handy, what are your options to make history?  Here’s my top 10 tips based on years of observation, listening to incredible stories of crashes and researching fatal crashes all over the country that will give you a pedal-up on your competing wanna-be awardees! *

Ride your bike while…

1. …staring at your phone and rarely look up, just go by “feel”.  You’ve been all over this campus so many times, you know every bump, bush, pothole;  who needs to actually see where they’re going?!

2. …wearing ear buds or better yet, full ear-covering headphones w/ music cranked up.  Your hearing is designed for awesome music not buses or trucks passing nearby.

3. … drinking coffee and going  no-handed for extra coolness just like the hip song “I can ride a bike with no handlebars!”.

BETTER YOUR ODDS!  Combine 2 or all 3 of the above for more  chances of a fatal crash!


Jump on your bike…

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Extra points for non-working front brakes!

4.  …without checking whether your brakes are working; who really needs brakes?!  Maybe just take them off altogether to save weight and use your feet to stop?!

5. …with your fork mounted backwards (just the way it came out of the box!).  Assembling a bike is easy-peasy like walking and chewing gum.

6. …without making sure someone hasn’t stolen your front wheel skewer that holds your wheel on the fork.

7. …with your handlebars flopping around completely loose.


Don't be a Ninja cyclist!
If you can see them that’s all that counts!  Right!?

Ride your bike….

8.  … on the sidewalk, in the bike lanes, wherever is the fastest (against traffic)!

9. …at night with no lights and dark clothing.

10.  … through red lights, stop signs, whatever.  Street laws are for cars/ trucks and wussies.

* This article is satire and not intended to be a serious guide to your demise.  Please DO NOT do these things if you would like to continue livingRead this article for REAL tips that will help save your life.

Cold-weather Riding Workshops

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Did you know that no matter how cold it gets you can still enjoy riding?

As a year-round cycling MSU professor of packaging (hat tip Diana Twede) likes to say “It’s just a matter of the correct packaging!”. Your body generates lots of heat while riding and you’re moving faster to your destination. MSU staff also keep the roads and paths very clear throughout the winter for everyone’s safety, although getting to campus is sometimes a little more challenging!

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Some budding winter cyclists getting a bike ready for the cold.

Come to the MSU Bikes Service Center for one or more of three classes offered in collaboration with MSU’s new WorkLife Office and learn more about getting you and your bike ready for winter cycling so you can enjoy it as much as we do! If none of these dates work for you then review our winter cycling tips here at your leisure.

If you’re already a cold-weather cycling veteran then PLEASE come with your setup and do some show ‘n tell to help inspire others!  The following workshops are FREE, short and full of good tips you can use this winter to have a better, safer more comfortable time.

Sessions are limited to 12 people attending with their bikes and requires at least 3 attendees, so RSVPs are requested. PLEASE INCLUDE YOUR EMAIL ADDRESS with your name if you want to be notified of possible changes/ cancellations due to lack of attendance or unforeseen circumstances.

Sorry, there is no visitor parking available nearby; click here for visitor parking information. They will ticket cars in the Bessey Parking lot til 6 pm.

We close the shop at 5 pm, so you’ll find the Closed sign up when you get here; the door should be unlocked so just come in or knock.

All ready for fun cold weather riding!
All ready for fun cold weather riding!

101 Session: (Tues. 11/08/16)

This session will focus on the overall/ general tips on how to prep your clothing and your bike for comfy, enjoyable and safe riding.

102 Session: (Mon. 11/14/16)

This session will mostly be a repeat of the 101 class for those who couldn’t attend it and then if time allows we’ll dig into more depth and other finer considerations of cold-weather riding.

103 Session: (Tues. 11/22/16)

This session will be a DIY studded tire and other DIY ways to modify your bike for added safety and comfort. Materials are NOT included and we’ll NOT have enough time to actually make your own studded tires but instead you’ll see a demonstration of how they’re made.

Any questions about the class? Call Tim Potter, our host: (517) 432-3414

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Offered in collaboration and with the support of MSU’s new WorkLife OfficeSee their event calendar for these and other great upcoming classes for learning opportunities for MSU faculty and staff.

Pedal for Platinum @ MSU

The League's Silver level award seal.
The League’s Silver level award seal.

After receiving the news in November 2015 from the League of American Bicyclists that MSU was upgraded to a silver-level Bike Friendly University award the MSU Bike Advisory Committee (BAC) decided that rather than just plod along towards gold we’d embark on a bold mission of jumping over gold and “Pedal for Platinum”.   “Spartans Will… Pedal for Platinum!” has a nice ring to it!

In true Spartan fashion, our mission launched with action.  We broke down the BFU applications of all the other platinum-level and new gold-level universities to see where the big differences were most apparent in MSU’s case (those comparisons can be viewed here for reference).   One of those that popped out at us were that other platinum universities had neighboring communities that were either platinum-level or gold, such that they were clearly working closely together to assure that the overall experience for their university community from home to campus would be a top-notch bike-friendly experience not just on campus.

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We began thinking how we might be able to facilitate helping our neighboring communities in their journey to become more bike friendly.  Bringing in some experts to meet with the community leaders came up as an option.  The costs for doing that quickly made it apparent that we’d need help in covering those costs.  The concept of a conference where we’d invite not only our neighboring community leaders but area business leaders and university staff as well was born.

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Click for a highlights video of the event.

Little did we know at the time, but we ended up leading the way with the country’s first-ever Bike Friendly America conference highlighting the League of American Bicyclists‘ entire award program to other universities, communities and businesses last May.  A wrap-up of the conference is here.

A host of other Bike Month events were also planned and hosted around the conference which all dove-tailed together to form a series of bike culture building opportunities.

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Tour de MSU group shot

Over the summer the BAC focused their attention on developing a more detailed plan for how MSU will reach platinum.  The draft below has been incorporated into the 2016 update of the Campus Master Plan (which has yet to be approved by the Board of Trustees) which is our current Pedal for Platinum campaign plan.  Additional action items and projects are being discussed and debated within the BAC which will be finalized and posted soon.

If you’d like to suggest some changes or additions to the plan please email Tim Potter or attend one of our upcoming public monthly meetings.


3. Goals & Recommended Strategies

The university will continue striving to improve its standing from a silver-level to a platinum-level Bicycle Friendly University based on the League of American Bicyclists’ ratings. Future goals and recommended strategies are organized around the League of American Bicyclists’ five essential elements: Engineering, Education, Enforcement, Encouragement, and Evaluation/Planning.  In addition, Michigan State University incorporates two additional elements, Environment and Economic, to form the basis for future actions.

3.1   ENGINEERING

Goal:
Strengthen and expand campus infrastructure to support safe, effective, and efficient bicycling.

Recommended Strategies:
1.    Design and construct all campus roadways as complete streets, complying with Michigan Public Acts 134 & 135 of 2010 and update university design and construction standards accordingly.
2.    Fund and construct the final segments of the MSU River Trail.
3.    Enhance and expand parking facilities within priority locations of the academic districts.  Incorporate a minimum bicycle parking ratio for new buildings and major renovations into the Standards for Construction – Design Guidelines.
4.    Increase parking supplies within the residential neighborhoods with a goal to accommodate 30% of the resident population.  Work with REHS to establish a prioritized strategy for implementation.
5.    Work with the lighting committee to assess and implement new night lighting in priority locations.
6.    Investigate traffic signal progressions per Campus Master Plan modality priorities (pedestrians first, bicycles second, transit third, private automobile last).
7.    Eliminate obstructions from potential ‘Clear Vision Areas’ to enhance safety for all users.

3.2   EDUCATION

Goal:
Develop and implement educational programs that promote bicycle usage and bicycle safety.

Recommended Strategies:
1.    Continue working with, and providing information for, student and parent orientation.
2.    Continued cooperation on safety campaigns with MSU Police and other campus groups.
3.    Enhance and promote the MSU Bikes website.
4.    Continue sponsoring bicycle maintenance educational sessions.
5.    Continue to conduct campus rides to increase bicycle awareness.
6.    Analyze results of the parking permit test concerning campus policies.

3.3   ENCOURAGEMENT

Goal:
Establish ongoing strategies promoting bicycling for faculty, staff, students, and visitors.

Recommended Strategies:
1.    Create and communicate incentives promoting bicycle commuting for faculty and staff through Human Resources and MSU Police.
2.    Identify, map, and promote secure storage and showering/locker facilities.
3.    Develop an annual fall bicycle event to promote bicycle registration, appropriate use, and safety.
4.    Create engaging community outreach events centered on bicycling.
5.    Execute a campus version of the International Car-free City Day.

3.4   ENFORCEMENT

Goal:
Clarify and reinforce observance of university ordinances, policies, rules, and regulations related to bicycle use on campus.

Recommended Strategies:
1.    Clarify nomenclature of bicycle facilities and revised ordinances as needed.
2.    Work with MSU Police to increase enforcement of traffic rules and to identify areas of repeat safety violations.
3.    Monitor and adapt the bicycle impoundment practices as required.
4.    Strengthen university bicycle registration efforts.
5.    Encourage bicyclists to report all collisions to MSU Police.

3.5   EVALUATION & PLANNING

Goal:
Monitor progress on recommendations, working through existing protocols and standing committees.

Recommended Strategies:
1.    Annually evaluate the progress on recommendations.
2.    Update the bicycle plan every five years as part of the Campus Master Plan update cycle.
3.    Work through AUTTC (All University Traffic and Transportation Committee) to draft position memoranda identifying bicycle system enhancements relative to new construction projects that not only benefit the project but the larger campus community as well.
4.    Continually assess existing and new recommendations through activity of the MSU Bikes Committee and AUTTC.
5.    Work with the Bike Collaborative initiative and other ad-hoc groups supporting bicycling.

3.6   ENVIRONMENT

Goal:
Encourage bicycle use to reduce scope 3 emissions related to vehicular circulation, especially single occupant motor vehicle operations.

Recommended Strategies:
1.    Incentivize bicycle use and other alternative modalities.
2.    Incorporate scope 3 emission savings into bicycle promotional advocacy.
3.    Continue the partnership between IPF, REHS and ASMSU to expand the existing bicycle share program.
4.    Continue to promote and strengthen CATA’s Clean Commute program and its Emergency Ride Home (ERH) voucher incentive.

3.7   ECONOMIC

Goal:
Reduce university costs associated with building and maintaining a robust vehicular circulation system by increasing bicycle use as a core modality for students, faculty, and staff.

Recommended Strategies:
1.    Encourage and incentivize faculty and staff bicycle use as a means of commuting to, and moving around, campus.
2.    Invest in secure and weather-protected parking facilities at strategic campus locations.

Departmental Bike Service Examples

A number of MSU departments provide bike-related services to their staff to encourage them to ride bikes more often for a host of reasons that are well known.  This blog article illustrates some of those bikes at work around campus.  The following are additional services & amenities that have been installed and/or purchased by departments.  Consider asking your department administration about providing something similar to improve the bike-friendliness of your department.  Our departmental fleet services are described on this page of our website.

Cyclotron Secure Bike Parking facility:

One of the newest department facilities on campus, this secured bike storage facility offers space for approx. 40 bikes under cover and behind fencing that is card-access controlled.  It also features a security camera to monitor access.  The Cyclotron has also had a traditional key-access bike locker on their premises for a number of years that’s been available to 2 bicyclists at any given time.  A video tour of the facility can be seen here.  Questions about this facility can be sent to Tim Potter.  Here are some photos of the facilities:

 

Bio-Engineering Secure Bike Parking Facility:

One of the newest research buildings on campus, the four-story, 130,000-square-foot Bioengineering Facility, features a nice secure MSU ID card-accessible bike parking facility on the exterior for area staff to use.  While it doesn’t feature a roof over the parking this is certainly a much improved amenity for staff in the buildings in this area who are concerned about the security of their bikes while at work.   This facility will be opening soon.  It is located between the Life Science and the Clinical Center buildings in the South Academic District.  Questions about this facility can be sent to Tim Potter.  Here are some photos of it as of taken this past summer:

Infrastructure Planning and Facilities’ Bike Services:

Gus on one of his work bikes
Gus on one of his work bikes in the IPF parking lot.

Employees of this large department have had the use of a growing fleet of bikes for decades.  Oftentimes trips to buildings on campus to check into maintenance issues can be easily done by bicycle to minimize costs to the department and provide options for staff to get some exercise and fresh air during their work day.  On the nicer days of the year it’s not uncommon for the 30 bike fleet (as of 10/18/16) to be in use.  Jeff Groll, the bike fleet manager for IPF, reports that of the 30 bikes in the fleet 6 are available for checkout by any IPF staff and the rest are assigned to individual employees.  Some of those assigned bikes even feature electric-assist systems to make the bike trips even less of a physical challenge as well as extending the possibilities of trips that can be done by bike.  Questions about the IPF bike fleet can be sent to Jeff here.   This IPF article (Aug. 2014) features the story of Gus Gosselin, who championed bike use within IPF for many years for additional background information.

Additionally, IPF has provided access to a bike locker for employees at the Simon Powerplant for a number of years.  Staff at this facility found the work environment inside to not be conducive for storing bikes inside, so the locker has helped provide an great alternative for some of their regular bike commuters with nicer bikes.  Some pics of that locker below:

Bikes at Work on Campus

Many people may not realize how much MSU departments and their staff use bikes to help make their work on & around campus more enjoyable, efficient and green.

In recent years MSU Bikes, Surplus and Recycling have all been utilizing bikes with large trailers to do even more work on campus that previously thought possible.  Their medium length Bikes at Work trailers allow them to haul up to 300- 600 lbs of cargo and with the help of electric-assist bikes staff don’t need super-human bicycling strength to haul those kinds of loads.

Here’s a photo gallery of Cayden Bunnell (formerly of Surplus & Recycling) at work w/ the rig on a nice fall day on campus (2015):

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This video
highlights the work by one of the Surplus/ Recycling staff who was the inaugural bike-trailer worker bee to start regular rounds collecting compost material and delivering recycling related supplies.

 

MSU Bikes has used the same type of trailer to haul its recycling materials, signage in parades and other special events, mobile bike repair clinic equipment and many other purposes. Some photos below show you the variety of cargo we’ve hauled over the years.

This past summer the Bailey Greenhouse and Urban Farm students (part of the MSU RISE Program) began making pedal-powered deliveries of their vegetables around campus with a little help from MSU Surplus/ MSU Bikes.  This video shows their delivery bike-trailer in action.

For over three decades the Infrastructure Planning and Facilities department has had the largest fleets of work bikes on campus (23 in Aug. 2014) which are heavily utilized throughout the year for work trips that don’t require a full-sized motor vehicle.  Gus Gosselin, former Director of Building Services and current Senior Engineer with IPF and co-founder of the MSU Bike Project (which was the forerunner to the current MSU Bikes Service Center), was instrumental in building up that fleet and helping the modest bike get the respect it deserves alongside other wheeled transportation options for IPF workers.  He’s been riding his bike to meetings, lunches and other work trips around campus for many years carrying his helmet into meetings to strategically let others know that he rode a bike.  (This article gives more background on this history of bicycling within IPF).

bikeunitThere are other departments that also heavily utilize bicycles to help them with their daily work on campus. A couple dozen lease their bikes from MSU Bikes’ utilizing our fleet services for their staff use throughout the work day. The MSU Police Dept.’s Bicycle Unit has the next sizable fleet of bikes which help their team of bike patrol officers with a host of work from Community policing, routine traffic enforcement and other types of enforcement where a bicycle provides unique benefits (they’re quiet, fast and can go places motor vehicles can’t go).

Three Easy & Cheap Things to Improve Your Ride

MSU Bikes has been “Helping people discover the joys of bicycling!” for over 10 years now on campus and I’ve been in the trenches here all those years.  If I were asked what three things would make your bike riding way more fun and easy here’s my list:

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Example of a couple students using their bikes as chairs. Photo courtesy CATA video.

1.  Raise your seat:
After 10 years of seeing thousands of bicyclists in our shop and out on the campus roads and paths I guestimate that over ¾ of those I see are riding with their seats anywhere from 2-6 inches too low.  I’m guessing many riders stopped riding when they started drivers’ education training and then brought their bikes from home that used to (maybe) fit them when they were 14 without making any changes to the fit.

Your bike is many things but is certainly not designed to be nor should it be sized to function as a chair.  It is a great healthy, non-motorized transportation tool and when adjusted right should feel wonderful to ride when seated.  If you’re feeling the need to stand often that’s another way your body is telling you to raise your seat.

Rule of thumb:
If you can reach the ground easily from the seat at a stop your seat is about 3-5 in. too low.  If you can touch the ground flat-footed, then raise your seat 4-6 inches or better yet get a larger bike.

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Example of riding with a low seat.
Photo courtesy of Calvin’s Corner, Park Tool. Click image for detailed article re: bike fit.

When you do come to a stop simply get off the seat and stand over the frame.  If you consider that you’re spending 90%+ of your time in the seat pedaling and not stopped, it’s pretty logical that the seat to pedal distance should be the right distance for your legs to do their job efficiently.  Exception:  BMX/ urban stunt or down-hill bikes that are designed to have seats extremely low to be able to do tricks or other special types of riding; these bikes aren’t designed for traveling distances, so riders typically have to stand all the time if they’re trying to go more than a mile or so.

Caution:
Your seat is attached to your bike via the seat post; it’s only so long and can only be safely raised so high.  Most of them are marked with some lines that say “Minimum insertion” or something obscure; that means “Don’t raise it any higher than this point if you don’t want to damage your bike or your body.”  We do sell longer seat posts for pretty cheap that can help get your seat up high enough if your seat post happens to be too short.

 

2.  Inflate your Tires:

Ashley Tisdale rides her bicycle
Typical flat tire cruising. Photo courtesy of X17online.com

We’ve replaced thousands of punctured tubes at MSU Bikes, sometimes more than 30 a day during a busy fay.  Most customers want to know what caused their flat, so we’ve built up a wealth of knowledge based on all that CSI work that we charge for:  the main reason, by far?  Very soft tires are the root cause of punctured tubes or flats.  It’s called a “pinch flat”.  Basically, there’s not enough air in the tire to protect the tube from the road, so when you hit a bump, pothole, etc. the force of the impact causes two instant cuts in the tube by the edges of the rim.  Or the tube is so low of air that it starts slipping with the tire around the wheel until it cuts itself at the air valve.

Rule of Thumb:
If you simply inflate your tires every 2-3 weeks (certainly monthly) at one of many FREE public air stations around campus you’ll prevent this most common type of flat.   This map shows you where all those DIY air stations are located on campus.  Additionally, your bike will ride MUCH easier and with less effort when your tires are inflated to the proper pressure (written on the sidewall of every tire made; for mountain bike tires that give a range [typically 45- 60 psi], use the lower pressure during the winter months or riding on the trails for better traction).

Caution:
When inflating very low or flat tires go slowly and stop and inspect occasionally; some tires fit very loosely and can blow off the rim with a loud “boom!”.  Pressurized hoses like outside MSU Bikes or gas stations can inflate quickly so take it slow!

 

3.  Oil Your Chain:

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Rusty chain photo courtesy of Chicago Home Photos.

You know the sound, the screeching high-pitch squeaking of a rusty chain going down the road/ path. Those chains are crying for oil, your bike’s next-best friend to air in the tubes.  A small bottle of chain oil from a bike shop like MSU Bikes will last you most of your 4 yrs. at MSU and also come in very handy if your key won’t turn in your lock very well before you snap your key off by forcing it.  Your chain and other components will last longer if properly oiled and your ride will be much more enjoyable not to mention those around you who will thank you for not screeching!

 

Tri-flow oil - great for chains and lubricating many other parts of a bike
Tri-flow oil – great for chains and lubricating many other parts of a bike.

Rule of Thumb:
Oil your chain when you re-inflate your tires or right after riding in the rain.  A little bit goes a long way, so don’t overdo it or you’ll have a big mess everywhere.  Wipe down the chain after oiling it to keep it cleaner and from becoming a big ugly mess.

Caution:
We recommend NOT using a spray-can type of oil as you can get overspray on other parts of your bike (like your brakes) that will cause serious safety problems.

 

If you’re not sure about any of this just stop by MSU Bikes and one of our staff would be happy to answer any questions about fit, help you find the recommended air pressure, or how to oil your chain.

Happy roads!

 

 

Bike Month Events @ MSU

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May was National Bike Month and there were a bunch of events that happened on or near campus to celebrate & encourage bicycling, improve bike safety, spread bike friendliness around the Midwest and have some fun along the way.

 


  • Our lead vehicle, courtesy of Go Green Trikes!
    Our lead vehicle, courtesy of Go Green Trikes! http://www.gogreentrikes.com

    Greater Lansing/ MSU/ E. Lansing Ride of Silence
    May 18, 5:30 pm ~9 pm
    MSU Bikes once again hosted the Ride of Silence on the campus for the Greater Lansing area.  Approx. 200 people joined in this very significant event that honored/ remembered bicyclists who’ve been seriously injured or killed in crashes with motor vehicles.  The evening wrapped up with an after-party at the Midtown Brewing Co. with great entertainment provided by The Fabulous Heftones.  We celebrated all the hard work area advocates are doing to improve things in the area to make it safer for cycling.  The TCBA Advocacy group is one such group that has monthly meetings open to the public and needs more people concerned about improving our roads.  The Facebook event page for the ride has many photos available for your viewing pleasure.  There is also a Facebook page for the Greater Lansing Ride of Silence that you might want to plug into to stay abreast.

 


  • Highlight photo from the Tour de MSU
    Highlight photo from the Tour de MSU ride around campus that wrapped up the Bike Friendly America Conference @ MSU, 2016

    MSU’s Bike Friendly America Conference
    May 19, 8 – 4 pm

    This first-year event saw 56 people in attendance for a full day of learning about how to encourage their university, business or community to become more bike friendly.  It featured many inspirational speeches and presentations and wrapped up with the Tour de MSU, a ride around the MSU campus and neighboring communities, to experience what’s happening on the streets in our area.

    Some of those speeches and presentations are captured on this video.
    Here’s a shorter highlights video of the event.  Additional articles regarding the event were published here and here.

    A few photos from the event are below.


    We’re looking forward to possibly doing a similar conference next year.  Stay tuned!

 


  • Annual Bike to Work/ Campus Day Breakfast
    May 20 – 7:30 – 9:30 am
    Twenty-six dedicated campus bicyclists got together at the Brody Cafeteria to celebrate National Bike to Work/ Campus Day with a breakfast and were inspired by our guest speakers, Steve Clark, Bike Friendly Community Coach for the League of American Bicyclists, and Steve Sanders, Bicycle Coordinator for the Univ. of MN – Minneapolis, a Platinum Bike Friendly University.Some photos from the event below:

 


  • Poster for 2nd Annual Greater Lansing Bike Movie Night event2nd Annual Greater Lansing Bike Movie Night
    May 20 – 7 – 11 pm
    Well over 100 people came out for an evening of 25 great short bike movies courtesy of the Tri-County Bike Association & their Advocacy Committee and other area sponsors.  Once again, thanks to the Kalamazoo Bike Film Festival organizers this series of shorts proved to be a blast and delivered many moments of the joys of bicycling of the entire spectrum of pedaling and human-powered machines!

 

 

 

 


Near Campus & Other Events – Activities

 

 


  •  Lansing Bike Party - April 2016 ride to Old TownLansing Bike Party weekly social, slow rides
    Every Friday evening, starting near campus (Peanut Barrel & The Avenue, Lansing), these are a great way to meet new friends and discover the hidden gems of the Greater Lansing area.

 

 


 

 

 


  • National Bike Challenge graphicNational Bike Challenge
    May 1 – Sept. 30, 2016
    Join in this national challenge to win prizes and bragging rights! MSU has a team (of sorts) who have done very well within the Big 10 over the past few years.  Join in the fun and jump on the MSU peloton!

MSU Annual Bike to Work/ Campus Day Breakfast

Twenty-six dedicated campus bicyclists got together on May 20, 2016, at the Brody Cafeteria to celebrate National Bike to Work/ Campus Day with a breakfast and were inspired by our guest speakers, Steve Clark, Bike Friendly Community Coach for the League of American Bicyclists, and Steve Sanders, Bicycle Coordinator for the Univ. of MN – Minneapolis, a Platinum Bike Friendly University.

Some photos from the event below:

 

 


Archived content:

BTWD-Home-Banner-2016

Join your fellow campus bicyclists on Friday, May 20 – 7:30 – 9:30 am at the Brody Cafeteria (large group room) to celebrate National Bike to Work/ Campus Day with a breakfast and get inspired by our guest speakers, Steve Clark, Bike Friendly Community Coach for the League of American Bicyclists, and Steve Sanders, Bicycle Coordinator for the Univ. of MN – Minneapolis, a Platinum Bike Friendly University.

Final conference flyer graphic
Click here to visit the conference website and register.

Our guest speakers will be on campus for our Bike Friendly America Conference happening the day before; please consider registering for that too!

Click here to RSVP for the breakfast; limited to the first 50 to sign-up.

Valet Bike Parking will be provided outside the main SE entrance to Brody Hall.  Looking for a couple volunteers to help watch the bikes during the breakfast (volunteers will get breakfast!).

Contact Tim Potter if you have any questions about the event or would like to volunteer to help with the VBP service.

MSU Bikes 10th Anniversary & Renovations Open House

Many thanks to those of you who came to the event and celebrated this past decade of spreading bike love on campus with us!   Here’s a video of the speeches given during the event.

 

—————–
Archived content:

newly expanded and updated porch of the MSU Bikes Service Center
The newly expanded and updated porch of the MSU Bikes Service Center as of this spring (2016). You can see the new glass doors with electric-assist opener, new wider porch area for displaying bikes out of the way of visitors, safety railings and the newly rebuilt Red Cedar Yacht Club deck in the background.

Come celebrate our 10th year of operations with the crew of MSU Bikes and a bunch of new safety/ access improvements to the entry to our Center!

Light refreshments will be served on the newly rebuilt deck outside the Center, another reason to celebrate!

Plenty of bike parking is available outside our Center! Sorry we have no visitor car parking available.

If we have rain we’ll have our reception inside the Center.

Please RSVP via our Facebook event page here.

For more information about all the renovations done to the Center this past year check this blog post and photo gallery.

Enjoy a walk down memory lane with MSU Bikes here (Facebook photo gallery).

MSU’s Bike Friendly America Conference

Highlight photo from the Tour de MSU
Highlight photo from the Tour de MSU ride around campus that wrapped up the Bike Friendly America Conference @ MSU, 2016

This first-year event on May 19, 2016, saw 56 people attend for a full day of learning about how to encourage their university, business or community to become more bike friendly. It featured many inspirational speeches and presentations and wrapped up with the Tour de MSU, a ride around the MSU campus and neighboring communities, to experience what’s happening on the streets in our area.

Some of those speeches and presentations are captured on this video.  Additional articles regarding the event were published here and here.

Presentations on the video & their start location:

Mark Meadows, Mayor of E. Lansing:  1:27
Dan Bollman, Assoc. VP of IPF:  3:45
Lou Anna Simon, MSU President: 6:27
Steve Clark, Bike Friendly Community Specialist, League of American Bicyclists: 7:45
Gus Gosselin, Mechanical Engr, IPF:  49:11
Tim Potter, Sustainable Transportation Mgr.: 57:27
Steve Clark 1:13:54highlights-video-screenshot
Steve Sanders, Alternative Transportation Manager, U of MN:  1:29:40

 Here’s a shorter highlights video of the event.

A few photos from the event are below.


We’re looking forward to possibly doing a similar conference next year. Stay tuned!

 


Archived content:

Final conference flyer graphic
Click here to visit the conference website and register.

Sorry, but registration is now closed.  Call (517) 334-9100 to manually register.  If you’re interested in sponsoring the conference please refer to this page of information.


 

Last November, Michigan State University was recognized as a Silver level Bicycle Friendly University. MSU joins an elite group of 28 other Silver level and 126 other BFUs who have received recognition from the League of American Bicyclists ranging from Bronze to Platinum.

The League's Silver level award seal.
The League’s Silver level award seal.

Who Should Attend?

  • Working for a business that is interested in becoming more Bike Friendly?  A spokesman for Steelcase will be sharing their rationale for pursuing the BFB award.

  • Inside city government and wondering how to move towards becoming more bike friendly?  Learn how Lansing, MI, a typical Midwest city is able to install a surprising amount of bike-friendly facilities every year.  A representative from Grand Rapids will also be presenting their story of how improving their city for bicycling has helped spur regional development.

  • Come learn more about the secrets of reaching Platinum Bike Friendly Univ. status from U-Minnesota-Minneapolis’ bike coordinator.

  • Want to know how being bike friendly means potentially hundreds millions of $$ for your state at many levels?  Listen to Michigan’s Bike Coordinator present the findings of a state-wide report showing how bicycling brings well over $600 mil. annually to the state.

In order to assist other universities, their surrounding communities and businesses to be recognized as bicycle friendly or to achieve the next step in the Bicycle Friendly Program, Michigan State University will host a “Bicycle Friendly America” conference on Thursday, May 19th, 2016 at the Kellogg Center on our beautiful campus. The conference will include general sessions as well as break-out sessions to present information specific to Bicycle Friendly Community, Bicycle Friendly University, as well as Bicycle Friendly Business.

We will have presenters from the League of American Bicyclists, the League of Michigan Bicyclists, the State of Michigan, other universities (including a Platinum level one), as well as Michigan State University, local communities and businesses.

Join us for a day of interaction to help make our campuses, communities, and businesses more bicycle friendly thus safer for all of us alike!

Registration is Open!  Click here to register.

Early bird registration is $100 and has been extended thru April 15; after midnight April 15 the fee will be $120.
Registration closed midnight on May 15. Sorry, no on-site registration

**Sponsors & Vendors click here for our sponsorship opportunities

 



Brought to you by:  

MSU Infrastructure Planning and Facilities: http://ipf.msu.edu/
MSU Bike Advisory Committee – https://msubikes.wordpress.com/msu-bac/
MSU Bikes Service Center – www.bikes.msu.edu

With technical & logistical support from the League of Michigan Bicyclists.

Questions?  Gggossel@ipf.msu.edu or 517-432-0501

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CATA Emergency Ride Home Extended to Bicyclists

This new bike-commuter benefit just in from Joe Fedewa, CATA’s Clean Commute manager:

If you have a long-distance bicycle commute at least 3 days a week, you may be eligible! The CATA Clean Commute Options’ Emergency Ride Home (ERH) program now gives you the confidence to commute by bike and still get home in an emergency.
CATA-Clean-Commute-graphic

It’s FREE and EASY to get started. Click here to apply for ERH service now! If qualified for the ERH program, you will receive a pair of vouchers every 6 months. If your bicycle breaks down, you get caught in a storm, or any other unplanned circumstance in which you cannot commute home by bike, simply redeem a voucher for a rental car pickup at your workplace or at the nearest Enterprise Rent-A-Car location and get home safely. (The step-by-step directions for use are written on the vouchers themselves)

To participate in the Emergency Ride Home program, you must be actively commuting via bicycle at least 3 days a week. Vouchers may only be redeemed on these days. The program is intended for commuters traveling into the region from an area well beyond any CATA fixed-route bus service. ERH applications will be reviewed and approved on a case-by-case basis.

MSU Moves up to Silver Bike Friendly University Award Status!

The League's Silver level award seal.
The League’s Silver level award seal. Click to view the MSU press release.

It’s an exciting time for 49 universities and colleges around the country who are new and renewing Bicycle Friendly Universities including MSU which moved up to a silver level award!  We’re now one of 28 silver-level BFUs!

This new list of BFUs represents a tremendous amount of work by hundreds if not thousands of people in these universities not to mention the monetary investments too in the effort to make campuses more bike friendly and educate the next generation on safe bicycling habits.

IMG_5717
The finished new porch staircase (as of 8/24/15)

Read MSU’s press release from Nov. 6, 2015 here.

Read the League’s full press release here which links to award information on all of the awardees.

Interested in helping MSU go for Platinum? Get involved with the MSU Bike Advisory Committee.

Lunchtime Rides Around Campus

Riding along Farm Ln., spring 2015 during Tour de MSU
Riding along Farm Ln., spring 2015 during Tour de MSU

Looking for something fun and a little different to do over one lunch hour a month?  Join some of your fellow campus bicyclists and take a slow, leisurely ride around MSU for fresh air, discover new things about campus, enjoy some conversation, etc.

We’ll meet up outside the MSU Bikes Service Center at noon on the last Wednesday of the month and ride for about an hour finishing up back at MSU Bikes.  Rides will feature several stops/ breaks, have a leader and sweeper (someone riding at the rear to help w/ anyone who might need assistance) and will cover anywhere from 3-10 miles at the most depending on the leader and route selected for the month.  Any bike type should be fine and air and mechanical assistance will be available at the start at MSU Bikes.

Brighter clothing, helmets, lights encouraged.  We’ll be following all rules of the road and the campus ordinances, so we won’t be riding on sidewalks, but will use the paths marked for bicycling.

Tim chatting about the Tour de MSU ride
Tim chatting about the Tour de MSU ride at the Sparty statue. The lunch time rides concept was birthed by this first successful organized ride around campus the spring of 2015.

If it’s pouring we’ll cancel the ride. If it’s light drizzle we’ll ride, Seattle/ Portland style!

We’ll continue riding throughout the year, so you’ll have the opportunity to learn about cold weather riding too by actually doing it!

Looking forward to riding with you!

The MSU Bikes Service Center's new exterior
The MSU Bikes Service Center’s new exterior – meet-up here.